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Herbert Von Karajan &The Philharmonia Orchestra- L.X.- 8784- (Condition 85-90%)
Herbert Von Karajan &The Philharmonia Orchestra- L.X.- 8784- (Condition 85-90%)
Herbert Von Karajan &The Philharmonia Orchestra- L.X.- 8784- (Condition 85-90%)
Herbert Von Karajan &The Philharmonia Orchestra- L.X.- 8784- (Condition 85-90%)
Herbert Von Karajan &The Philharmonia Orchestra- L.X.- 8784- (Condition 85-90%)
Herbert Von Karajan &The Philharmonia Orchestra- L.X.- 8784- (Condition 85-90%)
Herbert Von Karajan &The Philharmonia Orchestra- L.X.- 8784- (Condition 85-90%)
Herbert Von Karajan &The Philharmonia Orchestra- L.X.- 8784- (Condition 85-90%)
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Herbert Von Karajan &The Philharmonia Orchestra- L.X.- 8784- (Condition 85-90%)
Herbert von Karajan (born Heribert, Ritter von Karajan; German pronunciation: [ˈhɛɐbɛɐt fɔn ˈkaʁaˌjan]; 5 April 1908 – 16 July 1989) was anAustrian orchestra and opera conductor. To the wider world he was perhaps most famously associated with the Berlin Philharmonic, of which he was principal conductor for 35 years. Although his work was not universally admired, he is generally regarded as one of the greatest conductors of the 20th century, and he was a dominant figure in European classical music from the 1960s until his death.[1] Part of the reason for this was the large number of recordings he made and their prominence during his lifetime. By one estimate he was the top-selling classical music recording artist of all time, having sold an estimated 200 million records.[The Karajans were of Greek-Macedonian[3][4][5][6][7][8] or Aromanian[9] ancestry. His great-great-grandfather, Georg Karajan, was born in Kozani, a town in the then Ottoman province of Rumelia(present West Macedonia in today's Greece), leaving for Vienna in 1767, and eventually Chemnitz, Electorate of Saxony.[10] He and his brother participated in the establishment of Saxony's cloth industry, and both were ennobled for their services by Frederick Augustus III on 1 June 1792, thus the prefix "von" to the family name. The surname Karajánnis became Karajan.[11]Although traditional biographers ascribed a Serbian or simply a Slavic origin to his mother,[12] Karajan's family from the maternal side, through his grandfather who was born in the village ofMojstrana, Duchy of Carniola (today in Slovenia), was Slovene.[11][12][13] By this line, Karajan was related to Austrian composer of Slovene descent Hugo Wolf.[14] Karajan seems to have known some SlovenHerbert von Karajan's parents, Ernst and Marta (née Kosmač)
Karajan was born in Salzburg, Austria-Hungary, as Heribert Ritter von Karajan.[15] He was a child prodigy at the piano.[16] From 1916 to 1926, he studied at the Mozarteum in Salzburg, where he was encouraged to concentrate on conducting by his teacher, who detected his exceptional promise in that regard.In 1929, he conducted Salome at the Festspielhaus in Salzburg and from 1929 to 1934 Karajan served as first Kapellmeister at the Stadttheater inUlm. In 1933 Karajan made his conducting debut at the Salzburg Festival with the Walpurgisnacht Scene in Max Reinhardt's production of Faust. It was also in 1933 that von Karajan became a member of the Nazi party, a fact for which he would later be criticised.
In Salzburg in 1934, Karajan led the Vienna Philharmonic for the first time, and from 1934 to 1941, he was engaged to conduct operatic and symphony-orchestra concerts at the Theater Aachen.
Karajan's career was given a significant boost in 1935 when he was appointed Germany's youngest Generalmusikdirektor and performed as a guest conductor in Bucharest, Brussels, Stockholm, Amsterdam and Paris.[17][18] In 1937 Karajan made his debut with the Berlin Philharmonic and theBerlin State Opera, conducting Fidelio. He then enjoyed a major success at the State Opera with Tristan und Isolde. In 1938, his performance there of the opera was hailed by a Berlin critic asDas Wunder Karajan (the Karajan miracle). The critic asserted that Karajan's "success with Wagner's demanding work Tristan und Isolde sets himself alongside Furtwängler and de Sabata, the greatest opera conductors in Germany at the present time".[19] Receiving a contract with Deutsche Grammophon that same year, Karajan made the first of numerous recordings, conducting theStaatskapelle Berlin in the overture to The Magic Flute. On 26 July 1938, he married operetta singer Elmy Holgerloef. They divorced in 1942On 22 October 1942, at the height of the war, Karajan married Anna Maria "Anita" Sauest, born Gütermann. She was the daughter of a well-known manufacturer of yarn for sewing machines. Having had a Jewish grandfather, she was considered a Vierteljüdin (one-quarter Jewish woman). By 1944, Karajan was, according to his own account,[citation needed] losing favor with the Nazi leadership, but he still conducted concerts in wartime Berlin on 18 February 1945. A short time later, in the closing stages of the war, he and Anita fled Germany for Milan, relocating with the assistance of Victor de Sabata.[20][21] Karajan and Anita divorced in 1958.
Record Details
TitleHerbert Von Karajan &The Philharmonia Orchestra- L.X.- 8784- (Condition 85-90%)
ArtistHerbert Von Karajan
InstrumentsOrchestra 
GenreWestern Classical (Instrumental)
LanguageEnglish
LabelColumbia
Made InEngland
ManufactureThe Columbia Gramophone
Serial NoL.X.- 8784
Side One
  • Music For Strings,Percussion And Celesta Part-1
 
Side Two
  • Music For Strings,Percussion And Celesta Part-2
 
Specification
Size12 Inches
Speed78 RPM
Record Condition85-90%
Cover ConditionExcellent

 

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Artist
Artist - 1Herbert Von Karajan
Instruments
Instrument - 1Orchestra
Record Details
GenreWestern Classical(Instrumental)
LabelColumbia
LanguageEnglish
Size12 Inches
Speed78 RPM
Songs
Side1 - Song1Music For Strings,Percussion And Celesta Part-1
Side2 - Song1Music For Strings,Percussion And Celesta Part-2