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Hemant Kumar - Geets Of  Hemant Kumar - S/33ESX 4267 - (Condition - 90-95%) - LP Record
Hemant Kumar - Geets Of  Hemant Kumar - S/33ESX 4267 - (Condition - 90-95%) - LP Record
Hemant Kumar - Geets Of  Hemant Kumar - S/33ESX 4267 - (Condition - 90-95%) - LP Record
Hemant Kumar - Geets Of  Hemant Kumar - S/33ESX 4267 - (Condition - 90-95%) - LP Record
Hemant Kumar - Geets Of  Hemant Kumar - S/33ESX 4267 - (Condition - 90-95%) - LP Record
Hemant Kumar - Geets Of Hemant Kumar - S/33ESX 4267 - (Condition - 90-95%) - LP Record
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Hemant Kumar - Geets Of M]Hemant Kumar - S/33ESX 4267 - (Condition - 90-95%) - LP Record

Early Life -

Hemanta was born in the city of Varanasi, India. His family originated from Baharu village in West Bengal. They migrated to Kolkata in the early 1900s. Hemanta grew up there and attended Nasiruddin School and later Mitra Institution school of Bhawanipore area. There he met his longtime friend Subhas Mukhopadhyay who later became a Bengali poet. During this time, he developed a friendship with the noted writer Santosh Kumar Ghosh. At that time, Hemanta wrote short stories, Santosh Kumar wrote poems and Subhash Mukhopadhyay sang songs.

After passing the intermediate examinations (12th grade), Hemanta joined Bengal Technical Institute at Jadavpur to pursue Engineering. However, he quit academics to pursue a career in music, despite parental objection. He briefly tried literature and published a short story in a prestigious Bengali magazine called Desh, but by the late-1930s he was committed entirely to music.

Early Music Career -

Under the influence of his friend Subhas Mukhopadhyay, Hemanta recorded his first song for All India Radio in 1935. The first line of the song was "Amar Ganete Ele Nabarupi Chirantanii." Hemanta's music career was primarily mentored by the Bengali musician, Sailesh Duttagupta. In his early life Hemanta used to follow the famous Bengali singer Pankaj Mullick. For this he was nicknamed as "Chhoto Pankaj".In an interview on television in the early 1980s, Hemanta had mentioned that he had also received classical music training from Ustad Faiyaz Khan's student Fanivusan Banerjee, but his tutelage was cut short by Ustad's untimely death.

In 1937, Hemanta cut his first gramophone disc under the Columbia label. The songs (non-film) on this disc were "Janite Jadi Go Tumi" and "Balo Go Balo More" whose lyrics were by Naresh Bhattacharya and music was composed by Sailesh Duttagupta. Thereafter, every year Hemanta continued to record non-film discs for the Gramophone Company of India (GCI) till 1984. His first Hindi songs were "Kitana Dukh Bhulaya Tumne" and "O Preet Nibhanewali", released in 1940 under GCI's Columbia label. Music for these songs were composed by Kamal Dasgupta; lyrics were by Faiyaz Hashmi.

Hemanta's first film song was in the Bengali film Nimai Sanyas released in 1941. Music was scored by Hariprasanna Das. Hemanta's first compositions for himself were the Bengali non-film songs "Katha Kayonako Shudhu Shono" and "Amar Biraha Akashe Priya" in 1944. Lyrics were by Amiya Bagchi.

His first Hindi film songs were in Irada (1944 film) in 1944 under Pt. Amarnath's music direction. Hemanta is considered a foremost exponent of Rabindra Sangeet. His first recorded Rabindra Sangeet was in the Bengali film Priya Bandhabi (1944). The song was "Pather Sesh Kothaye". He recorded his first non-film Rabindra Sangeet disc in 1944 under the Columbia label. The songs were "Aamar Aar Habe Na Deri" and "Keno Pantha E Chanchalata".

His first movie as a music director was the Bengali film Abhiyatri in 1947. Although many of the songs Hemanta recorded during this time received critical acclaim, major commercial success eluded him until 1947. Some contemporary male singers of Hemanta in Bengali were Jaganmay Mitra, Robin Majumdar, Satya Chowdhury, Dhananjay Bhattacharya, Sudhirlal Chakraborty, Bechu Dutta and Talat Mahmood.

Family -

Hemanta had three brothers and a sister, Nilima. His elder brother, Tarajyoti, was a short-story writer in Bengali. The youngest brother, Amal Mukherjee, composed music for some Bengali movies, most notably Hospital and Abak Prithibi. He recorded a few Bengali songs in the 1960s.

In 1945, Hemanta married Bela Mukherjee (died 25 June 2009),[5] a singer from Bengal. Although Bela had sung some popular songs in a TV =newsfeed&oq newsfeed&oq newsfeed&oq newsfeed&oq movie, Kashinath (1943), with music by Pankaj Mullick, she did not actively pursue her musical career after marriage.

They had two children: a son, Jayant, and a daughter, Ranu. Ranu as Ranu Mukhopadhyay pursued a music career in the late 1960s and early 1970s, with somewhat limited success. Jayant is married to Moushumi Chatterjee, an Indian film actress who was popular in the 1970s.

Success and migration to Mumbai -

In the mid-1940s, Hemanta became an active member of the Indian People's Theatre Association (IPTA) and started an association with another active IPTA member — songwriter and composer Salil Chowdhury. One of the main driving forces behind the establishment of IPTA was the Bengal famine of 1943 and the inaction of the British administration and wealthy Indians to prevent it.

In 1947, Hemanta recorded a non-film song called "Ganyer badhu" ("The rural bride") that had music and lyrics by Salil Chowdhury. The six-minute song recorded on two sides of a 78 rpm disc was sung at a varying pace and lacked the conventional structure and romantic theme of a Bengali song. It depicted an idyllic, prosperous and caring rural woman's life and family and how it gets ravaged by the demons of famine and ensuing poverty. This song generated an unforeseen popularity for Hemanta and Salil in eastern India and, in a way, established Hemanta ahead of his male contemporaries. Hemanta and Salil paired again in several songs over the next few years. Almost all these songs proved to be very popular.

Around the same period, Hemanta started receiving more assignments for music composition for Bengali films. Some were for directorHemen Gupta. When Hemen moved to Mumbai a few years later, he called upon Hemanta to compose music for his first directorial venture in Hindi titled Anandmath under the Filmistan banner. Responding to this call, Hemanta migrated to Mumbai in 1951 and joined Filmistan Studios. The music of Anand Math (1952) was a moderate success. Perhaps, the most notable songs from this movie is 'Vande mataram' sung by Lata Mangeshkar, which Hemanta set to a marching tune. Following Anandamath, Hemanta scored music for a few Filmistan movies like Shart in subsequent years, the songs of which received moderate popularity. Simultaneously, Hemanta gained popularity in Mumbai as a playback singer. His songs playbacked for actor Dev Anand under music director Sachin Dev Burman in movies like Jaal, House No. 44, Solva Saal and Baat ek raat ki became quite popular.

Career Rise -

By the mid-1950s, Hemanta had consolidated his position as a prominent singer and composer. In Bengal, he was one of the foremost exponents of Rabindra Sangeet and perhaps the most sought-after male singer. In a ceremony organised by Hemanta Mukherjee to honour Debabrata Biswas (1911–1980), the legendary Rabindra Sangeet exponent, in Calcutta in March 1980, Debabrata Biswas unhesitatingly mentioned Hemanta as "the second hero" to popularise Rabindra Sangeet, the first being the legendary Pankaj Kumar Mallick. In Mumbai, along with playback singing, Hemanta carved a niche as a composer. He composed music for a Hindi film called Nagin (1954) which became a major success owing largely to its music. Songs of Nagin remained chart-toppers continuously for two years and culminated in Hemant receiving the prestigious Filmfare Best Music Director Award in 1955. The very same year, he scored music for a Bengali movie called Shapmochan in which he played back four songs for the Bengali actor Uttam Kumar. This started a long partnership between Hemant and Uttam as a playback singer-actor pair. They were the most popular singer-actor duo in Bengali cinema over the next decade.

In the latter part of the 1950s, Hemanta composed music and sang for several Bengali and Hindi films, recorded several Rabindra Sangeets and Bengali non-film songs. Almost all of these, especially his Bengali songs, became very popular. This period can be seen as the zenith of his career and lasted for almost a decade. He sang songs composed by the major music directors in Bengal such as Nachiketa Ghosh, Robin Chatterjee and Salil Chowdhury. Some of the notable films Hemanta himself composed music for during this period include Harano Sur, Marutirtha Hinglaj, Neel Akasher Neechey, Lukochuri, Swaralipi, Deep Jwele Jaai, Shesh Parjanta, Kuhak, Dui Bhai, and Saptapadi in Bengali, and, Jagriti and Ek Hi Raasta in Hindi.

Movie Production -

In the late 1950s, Hemanta ventured into movie production under his own banner: Hemanta-Bela productions. The first movie under this banner was a Bengali film directed by Mrinal Sen, titled Neel Akasher Neechey (1959). The story was based on the travails of a Chinese street hawker in Calcutta in the backdrop of India's freedom struggle. The movie went on to win the President's Gold Medal — the highest honour for a movie from Government of India. In the next decade, Hemanta's production company was renamed Geetanjali productions and it produced several Hindi movies such as Bees Saal Baad, Kohraa, Biwi Aur Makaan, Faraar, Rahgir and Khamoshi — all of which had music by Hemanta. Only Bees Saal Baad and Khamoshi were major commercial successes.

Back in Bengal, Hemanta scored music for a movie titled Palatak in 1963 where he experimented with merging Bengal folk music and light music. This proved to be a major success and Hemanta's composition style changed noticeably for many of his future films in Bengal such as Baghini, and Balika Badhu. In Bengali films Manihar and Adwitiya, both of which were major musical as well as commercial successes, his compositions had a light classical tinge. In 1961, for commemorating Rabindranath Tagore's birth centenary, Gramophone company of India featured Rabindrasangeet by Hemanta in a large portion of its commemorative output. This too proved to be a major commercial success. Hemanta went on several overseas concert tours including his trip to the West Indies. Overall, in the 1960s decade he retained his position as the major male singer in Bengal and as a composer and singer to be reckoned with in Hindi films.

In the 1960s he was the predominant and lead male voice in many of Tagore's musical dramas like Valmiki Pratibha, Shyama, Sapmochan, Chitrangada and Chandalika. With Kanika Bandopadhyay (1924–2000) and Suchitra Mitra (1924–2010), who were the lead female voices in these, he was part of the Rabindra Sangeet triumvirate that was popular and respected. It was referred as 'Hemanta-Kanika-Suchitra' and, with Debabrata Biswas, this quartet was and continues to be most heard exponents of Tagore compositions.Along with Hemanta Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata Biswas, Kanika Bandopadhyay and Suchitra Mitra, Chinmoy Chattopadhyay, Sagar Sen and Sumitra Sen were the other leading exponents of Rabindra Sangeet at that time.

Record Details

Title

Hemant Kumar Geets Of Hemant Kumar - S/33ESX 4267

Singer

Hemant Kumar

Music

Hemant Kumar, Ravi, Kamal Dasgupta & Tarasam Lal

Lyrics

Gulzar, Hasrat Jaipuri, Faiaz Hashmi, Santosh Singh, S.H. Bihari & Ravi          

Releasing Year

1980

Genre

Private Songs

Language

Hindi

Label

Columbia

Made In

India

Manufacture

The Gramophone Company Of India Limited

Serial No.

S/33ESX 4267

Side One

  • Abhi Na Parda Girao

Hemant Kumar

  • Kal Teri Tasbir

Hemant Kumar

  • Madhuban Men Shyam

Hemant Kumar

  • Musibar Ko Bula Raha Hoon

Hemant Kumar

  • Pa Kar Bhi Tumhe

Hemant Kumar

  • Girado Pardah

Hemant Kumar

Side Two

  • Mohabbat Ka Nateeza

Hemant Kumar

  • Main Prem Mein

Hemant Kumar

  • Patthar Ki Tarah

Hemant Kumar

  • Aaj Phir Chand Ki

Hemant Kumar

  • Ishq Akhose Rona

Hemant Kumar

  • Kash Ekbar Kabhi

Hemant Kumar

Specification

Size

12 Inches

Speed

33 RPM

Record Condition

90-95%

Cover Condition

Excellent                                                                

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Lyrics
Lyrics - 1Gulzar
Lyrics - 2Hasrat Jaipuri
Lyrics - 3Faiaz Hashmi
Lyrics - 4Santosh Singh
Lyrics - 5S.H. Bihari
Lyrics - 6Ravi
Music
Music - 1Hemant Kumar
Music - 2Ravi
Music - 3Kamal Dasgupta
Music - 4Tarasam Lal
Record Details
GenrePrivate Songs
LabelColumbia
LanguageHindi
Releasing Year1980
Size12 Inches
Speed33 RPM
Singer
Singer - 1Hemant Kumar
Songs
Side1 - Song1Abhi Na Parda Girao
Side1 - Song2Kal Teri Tasbir
Side1 - Song3Madhuban Men Shyam
Side1 - Song4Musibar Ko Bula Raha Hoon
Side1 - Song5Pa Kar Bhi Tumhe
Side1 - Song6Girado Pardah
Side2 - Song1Mohabbat Ka Nateeza
Side2 - Song2Main Prem Mein
Side2 - Song3Patthar Ki Tarah
Side2 - Song4Aaj Phir Chand Ki
Side2 - Song5Ishq Akhose Rona
Side2 - Song6Kash Ekbar Kabhi